Header Ads

The U.S. Supreme Court recognized a significant portion of Oklahoma — about half its territory — as land owned by an Indian reservation.


The U.S. Supreme Court recognized a significant portion of Oklahoma — about half its territory — as land owned by an Indian reservation. This will change the situation of the indigenous people of the state, reports The New York Times .

Five judges voted for this decision, four opposed. Almost the entire eastern part of the state with a population of 1.8 million people is now officially considered the land of five Native American tribes - Chickasaw, Choctaw, Cherokee, Seminole and Muscogee, belonging to the Creek nation, on behalf of which the lawsuit was filed against the state government.

The reservation includes a significant portion of Tulsa, Oklahoma's second largest city and oil production center. It is specified that the outcome of the trial will entail a review of hundreds of court sentences - representatives of indigenous peoples must be judged either by tribal courts, or, in the case of serious offenses, by federal ones.

It is likely that the consequences of this court decision will be felt by the state tax system, environmental regulation and a number of other state apparatuses. In addition, it is called a milestone for Native Americans as a whole - on the basis of this precedent, further cases will be conducted on similar issues.

The reason for it was the fact that the US federal government promised the people of Creek nation this territory as a reservation in the 19th century, and then, in violation of the treaty, consistently cut it to much smaller sizes and deprived of autonomy. Legally, however, the reservation was not reduced or abolished - and thus formally existed all this time.

The lands were promised to the Indians after they were forced to leave their native lands in the states of Georgia and Alabama - their journey from one part of the present United States to another is known as the “Way of Tears”.

No comments

Powered by Blogger.